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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 18, 2018 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello — this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. boosting french border controls and taking in more migrants from calais — the prime minister will announce a new agreement with france today. as theresa may hosts president emmanuel macron, she'll say almost £45 million will be spent beefing up security around the channel. good morning. it's thursday 18 january. a third day of snow, and a night of strong winds continue to cause hazardous conditions. over seven inches of snow fell in parts of northern england. through the morning rush hour if you are in lincolnshire and east anglia, some damaging gusts of wind. more in 15
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minutes. the flagship "free" childcare scheme in england — now one charity says parents are subsidising it from their own pockets. are of champagne. it is really bound to in small doses. —— i'd offer you a glass of champagne. he was the actor behind television sleuth jason king — peter wyngarde has died in hospital at the age of ninety. taxpayers owe private companies like carillion almost 200 billion pounds to complete big building projects and the public spending watchdog says it's not the best value for money. in sport — curtains for konta. the british number one is out of the australian open after a shock defeat to the world number 123. good morning. first, our main story. britain is to increase its contribution towards border controls in france by nearly 45 million pounds, and commit to taking in more migrants calais. the deal will be announced at a summit between theresa may and the french president emmanuel macron this afternoon. their meeting — at the army's officer training academy in sandhurst — is being seen as the most important
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for several years, as our diplomatic correspondent, james robbins, reports. this summit is very deliberately being held at sandhurst, britain's military academy of officer cadets. the venue underlined the fact that britain and france are the key military powers in europe, used to working together and today committing to greater co—operation, even if the background to all of this is, of course, brexit. and in other ways britain and france are heading into very different directions. under pressure from president macron, theresa may will take in some migrant stuck in calais and desperate across the channel. so expect more unaccompanied children to be allowed into britain, as well as adults who successfully argued that their ad mission will reunite families. but the longer—term deals will focus on defence. britain is sending three british chinook helicopters to mali, they are large troop carrying aircraft that the french badly lack
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in their fight against islamists. britain will broaden its military in that area. britain will backup troops in the baltic state of estonia. the stalker fiona in cumbria. i can see the traffic is moving behind you but we've seen lots of problems on the roads over the last 2a hours. that's right. people are bracing themselves the snow. it's notjust snow that
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has a problem. today's high winds as well, were expecting gusts. weather warnings have been expected. further north, motorists stranded. motorists we re north, motorists stranded. motorists were warned not to travel and its assumed they heeded that warning. we will hear from assumed they heeded that warning. we will hearfrom our assumed they heeded that warning. we will hear from our scotland correspondence later in the programme. the latest from the met office, no amber warnings. are you waking up to snow this morning?
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or has yourjourney been affected by the high winds? you can send us your photos and videos to our whatsapp number: 07 990 99 88 66. there are calls for all women over the age of 30 should be screened for a faulty gene linked to higher rates of breast and ovarian cancer. research by the barts cancer institute in london found testing would prevent thousands of cancers, and be cost effective for the nhs. in deal signed under private finance initiatives, the government can borrow from private firms to build facilities like schools and hospitals. it was found more than 700 deals had charges of more than £10 million. benazir to explain more. it's a lot of money. just to
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clarify, the government will say to a private contractor, built amid this and we will pay you back over 30 or a0 years. if the cost of repayment. in medication is, it says there are 716 projects under way. they cost more than £10 billion a year just to they cost more than £10 billion a yearjust to bay back. they say they cost more than £10 billion a year just to bay back. they say that there is no evidence that it is big ballet for money. it means for the critics, it means many local particularly organisations like the nhs. parents in england are subsidising free nursery care because it hasn't been properly funded by the government — that's according to a survey published today. the report, by the pre—school learning alliance,
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found that nurseries which provdide 30—hours of free childcare, are having to ask parents to cover the cost of nappies and lunches. some say if they don't, they could face closure. the government says it is investing 6 billion pounds in childcare by 2020. elaine dunkley reports. how many of the pink do you think i've got? how many of the pink beads have we got? at sparkling stars pre—school in poole, the numbers do not add up. it is struggling financially provide children with 30 hours of free care the only person that this policy is free to is the government. it's not free to providers. we're subsidising this policy. it's not free to parents, or their children, because we're having to ask for additional contributions to cover part of what we offer, that the funding does not cover. we would love the word "free" to be replaced by "funded" or "subsidised." the scheme to double free childcare for three— and four—year—olds from 15 hours per week to 30 was introduced last september.
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but, with nurseries now struggling, families are being asked to pick up additional costs. the report from the pre—school learning alliance suggests only 35% of childcare providers are delivering 30 hours per week completely free. 37% have introduced or increased charges for things such as meals and snacks, to make up the shortfall. 38% of providers are uncertain whether they will be offering 30—hour places in one year's time. when they go on to bigger schools, you are not expected to make donations and things there. it should be free for everybody. the department for education said it has always been clear that the government funding is not intended to cover the cost of meals or additional services, and while providers can charge parents for additional extras, this cannot be a condition of each child's place. senior police officers, barristers and prosecutors will meet this morning to discuss ways to address problems caused by the non—disclosure of evidence. the high—level meeting will be chaired by the director of public prosecutions
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in england and wales, alison saunders. it comes amid growing concern over a series of rape cases which collapsed after material emerged which undermined the prosecution. patient safety in accident and emergency units in wales is being compromised to an "unacceptable degree" according to hospital consultants. a group of a6 doctors is warning of the risks in a letter sent to the first minister. monthly performance figures will be published later this morning. nhs wales say it's been a very challenging winter, we have heard warnings of emergency units in other parts of the uk being a braking points and this time it is the turn of doctors in wales to speak out. a group of consultants to britain to the welsh first minister believed the situation here is the worst it's ever been. this is usually concerning, staff members coming to work, the glue that holds the nhs together, coming in doing their shifts but going home in tears
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and we have got patients in the department when we don't have space to see them and we are coming back the next day and some of the patients are still here. the monthly performance figures to wales will be published this morning but in this matter the published —— the co nsulta nts matter the published —— the consultants warn the first minister: it acknowledges efforts have been made to plant the winter pressures including more investment but says it is simply not enough. patient safety is being compromised, the doctors say, and the letter calls for a significant increase in funding. those in charge of the nhs in wales say it's been a very challenging winter with demand is exceeding expectations. they believe there are signs that things are improving. the actor peter wyngarde, who played the flamboyant 60s crime—fighterjason king, has died aged 90. wyngarde shot to fame in the series "department s" but was also a prolific stage actor and director.
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ben ando looks back on his life. it is 11 minutes passed. some bad news i'm afraid. joanna konta, our best chance of success at melbourne park. we are not taking anything away from kyle edmund. he has better, nadal to get past. jo konta, she has dropped out in the second round. not dropped out, she was beaten, quite considerably by a player you'd expect a breeze past normally. the ninth seed out of the australian open. she was beaten by
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the 123 and number player in the world. joanna konta struggled to find her game. chelsea beat norwich on penalties 5—3 in a dramatic fa cup replay at stamford bridge. eden hazard scored the winning spot kick after his side were reduced to 9 men in extra time. earlier willian was booked for diving and the referee appeared not to consult var, even though replays suggested he might have been clipped. chelsea will face newcastle next. the shock of the night though came at league one side wigan, who put in a dominant performance to beat premier league side bournemouth 3—0, securing themselves a home tie against west ham in the fourth round. elsewhere, swansea beat championship leaders wolves 2—1 to progress. the ecb say ben stokes is available for their tour of new zealand. their decision comes two days after stokes was charged with affray folllowing a nightclub brawl last september. stokes was left out of the recent ashes tour due to the ongoing police investigation. those in the papers this morning about that decision. nasser hussain writing in the daily mail, saying what kind of message does this end, thatis
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what kind of message does this end, that is not charged with any crime, not charged with any bad behaviour and they leave him out of the ashes but the moment he is charged with affray, is available for selection again. the ecb have gotten that wrong. we will be joined again. the ecb have gotten that wrong. we will bejoined by again. the ecb have gotten that wrong. we will be joined by then. let's find out what is happening. our correspondence in cumbria, it's clear that people need be mindful. there is a lot of wind around. numerous hazards this morning. good morning. lots of snow across the of england. this is the weather system responsible. the rain and strong winds, let's concentrate on the snowfall. these are the routes likely to be affected. the snow has been fizzling out. there will be ongoing impacts throughout the morning rush—hour. have seen as much
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as seven inches of snowfall overnight. the windsor becoming more and more a feature. these are recent gusts from eastern parts of england. over the next few hours, coastal parts of lincolnshire and east anglia could see winds gusting to 80 miles per hour. they are going to cause a huge amount of problems. please take it easy. further west, not as strong as we have seen the recent hours. some heavy showers in north—west england. improving as far as the rain and snow is concerned that here and across scotland and northern ireland, ice is the big story. a mixture of sleet and snow. through the day, the strongest winds quickly depart. this could be a blustery day, nothing untoward lots of showers in the west. scotland, northern ireland and northern england, a further covering in places. some southern and eastern
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parts, it will stay dry to rapid rate the day but the wind will make it feel cold indeed. still a bit of a breeze growing more showers out. a few centimetres of snow certainly possible. an ice risk into tomorrow morning. temperatures lower than this, of course, in some rural areas and more of a forced into tomorrow morning in the south. or friday, lots of showers. northern england and wales. a few towards the south. a mixture of rain, hail and sleet. some rumbles of thunder. sunshine in between. those are your afternoon temperatures and it will feel colder than that. widespread frost to begin with. not a bad day to start the weekend. cloud increasing from the south—west later on. that cloud
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continues to pushing through the night and into sunday morning, bringing outbreaks of rain across many parts. preceded by snow over higher ground on sunday which may cause a few issues before it turns back to rain later and temperatures rise. a change of weekend. we have ice to content with in lincolnshire and east anglia. thank you very much. we will have a look through some of the papers now. let's look at the front pages. on the front page of the daily telegraph, emmanuel macron of course having a meeting with theresa may today. in amongst the issues they will be talking about, this £aa million figure to keep border guards in calais. however, the majority of what they will be talking about is not so much brexit related at a lot of security issues and we will be
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talking about those later on. the duchess of cambridge, opening a wing ata duchess of cambridge, opening a wing at a hospital. and the child you can see, raphael chand, is waiting for a heart transplant. —— chandler. see, raphael chand, is waiting for a heart transplant. -- chandler. he has certainly won the hearts of many —— she has certainly won the hearts of many. and again, the main story, taking a look at the visit by a emmanuel macron today to the uk. on the front page of the times, i know you mentioned in a few minutes ago. these billions, enormous sums of money spent on wasteful pfi, this is in the news at the moment because of carillion. yes, and this was done before the carillion collapse, by the national audit office. it is also on the front page of the business pages of the telegraph, and it is looking at how valuable these are. the government says they are
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useful because they can offload the risk and the cost of public finance initiative projects to private business but there is a lot of criticism of how much they cost and whether they are tying local organisations like the nhs into deals which are too inflexible. so it is not particularly new but i think the issue is that even if we sign no new deals from tomorrow, it will still cost us as taxpayers £200 billion. and you mention you are going to take a look at the cricket. the cricket is all over the daily mail, but i was going to take the chance to talk about alexis sanchez, because this deal has been rumbling oi'i because this deal has been rumbling on in the transfer window. alexis sanchezis on in the transfer window. alexis sanchez is on the verge of signing the manchester united, snatched away from manchester city because they said they were not prepared to pay as much as he was asking for. said they were not prepared to pay as much as he was asking forlj thought they had more money, manchester city. they have an awful lot of money but manchester united have come in and said they will pay
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a staggering £500,000 a week for the chilean. and this is 103 year old kitty, a bristol rovers football fan who first went to a match on a steam train in1954, and who first went to a match on a steam train in 1954, and she has spent every home game there ever since. she was asked what had changed over the years, she said the crowd is not as raucous as it used to be, and the money has changed. she said it has gotten too big, kitty, the money has gotten too big, kitty, the money has got out of hand but i suppose that is how things are these days. and she is 103. she says at one point she is 103. she says at one point she fainted in the crowd, and the st john's ambulance people had to carry her over everybody's heads to get her over everybody's heads to get her down to get some care. crowd surfing! exactly, she sounds like an absolute star. the big story in the paper is the cricket, and the fact that ben stokes has been selected to
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play in england's next test series down in new zealand after being charged with affray, so lots of comment writers talking about whether that is the right call to make from the ecb. when he was in charge, they said he was not available for selection but when the crown prosecution service say actually what you did is serious enough to be charged and criminal proceedings start, now he can come back into the england team. and that is on the inside of the sun as well, spineless shambles as their headline on that. and this is an interesting one, we talked about that the tax cut in the united states for business, reducing taxes from 35% to 2196. business, reducing taxes from 35% to 21%. the first example of the difference it makes, the tech giant apple says it will move production back to the united states and will pay $38 billion in tax, a 1—off tax payment for bringing some of its profits from overseas back to the united states. it has been hit with a tax bill of $38 billion. but at the same time it says it will spend
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$30 billion to expand operations in the united states, so expect to hear a lot from president trump about why his tax cuts made that possible. and the daily telegraph, some of these pictures you will remember from movies. clint eastwood, you can see, and the story here is the university of edinburgh has done a report about the use of apes, particularly, in movies, and criticising the use of apes, specifically, they say, the shot where the ape looks like they are grinning, as is often the way, to try and make the ape look like they are happy in the film, they say it usually... i am listening! i am looking behind me, it is like a teacher, when the ape appears to be smiling, is of course, the experts tell us, when they are in distress. so they are worried that some of the shots they have, the fine shot of
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clint eastwood having a laugh... aren't they usually cgi now come anyway? yes, i guess to a greater degree now they don't have to use real animals in the films.|j degree now they don't have to use real animals in the films. i don't think it is only about apes. are you in distress, naga? is that why you are smiling like that? music therapy is nothing new, but new evidence showing just how much it can help people with dementia will be presented to mps today. research shows it can help alleviate some of the condition‘s symptoms, and enhance a patient‘s quality of life, but experts say not enough care homes offer music sessions to their residents. breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. you see people come back to life. there's a great raising of self—esteem. there's a great raising of
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self-esteem. in this hall in croydon, the singing for the brain choir meet each week. these are people with a diagnosis of dementia, their carers, and their carers. the people with the diagnosis realise they are equals again. they can do whatever else is doing, in some cases better. for dad, it is the joy in his eyes. and look, he keeps smiling. he loves it. music is for the soul, to put it lightly. music's ability to help people with dementia has been known for years, but many with the condition don't have access to groups like this. today, the international longevity centre will deliver the biggest report of its kind to the house of lords is, calling for greater music provision and the national framework to deliver it. we have been hearing about how to decrease the use of antipsychotic medication, and music provides a really fantastic
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alternative. only 5% of care homes in the uk have good quality arts and music provision for their residents. we really want to see that increased. you don't have to perform music to reap the benefits, according to research in this report. just listening to it can have a hugely positive effect. we have a hugely positive effect. we have a hugely positive effect. we have a better memory for the music you listen to between the ages of ten and 30. so if you have got a relative with dementia, even if they can't communicate with you any more, you can think back to when they would have been ten to 30 years old, and use that as a key to unlock the kinds of music that they might really enjoy, and might have a lot of benefits for them. have you got a favourite song? for you? que sera sera! . has dementia. her husband, george, says this choir transforms her —— dot. george, says this choir transforms her -- dot. can't wait to get here. yes, i loved every bit of it. more
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than 30 years ago, paul hardcastle raised awareness of another issue, the treatment of vietnam veterans. his song 19 was a global hit. now, he is calling on the music industry to do more to help people with dementia, by offering free performances and personalised playlists. the main thing about this is there is no downside to actually using music. it is not like we're asking people to test new drugs. it has been proven beyond doubt that this is working. and the music industry is big enough to really help out, and i think it should be. a message to be delivered with unified voice. help music help more people. it was so lovely seeing dot and georgejust find it was so lovely seeing dot and george just find each other again. and it makes perfect sense, because ifi and it makes perfect sense, because if i heara and it makes perfect sense, because if i hear a song played from when i was a teenager, it almost brings
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back those feelings from when you we re back those feelings from when you were a teenager, and you have soundtracks of your life, don't you? and if that has affect you in some way, let us know. we will be talking about it later on this morning as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. the government is planning to take legal action to stop anti—hs2 protestors from demonstrating in west london. they set up a camp last october on a site earmarked for development in hillingdon, and say the new line is unnecessary and will badly affect local people and wildlife. however, hs2 says it has a duty to deliver the project on time and on budget, and it is a matter of safety. but protestors are unconvinced. no, we have done nothing unsafe at all. any vehicle has been stationary. you know, there has been
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no engines on. and certainly i can only speak for myself, we have been trying to protect the trees, protect the environment, by sitting in front of their vehicles. the streets of the capital will be turned into a vast night—time art exhibition for the lumiere london festival. more than 50 artists have created installations, which will light up central london. you will not be able to miss it if you are anywhere near the west end, king's cross, westminster, victoria, the south bank or fitzrovia, all areas where exhibits are being shown for the next four evenings. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube: no service on northern line northbound, between golders green and edgware, due to obstruction on the line. severe delays victoria line, following a track fault earlier. south—western railway services have been suspended btw guildford and havant, following two trees on the line. there is also disruption on services between alton and aldershot. on the roads: the a13 has the usual delays from dagenham into town towards barking. at the dartford river crossing, the qe2 bridge is closed due to this morning's strong winds, with traffic in both directions
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diverted via the dartford tunnels. in tufnell park, tufnell park road is closed at carleton road, due fallen tree near the rock tower. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. well, after a rather turbulent night last night, things should be using a little today, but we are not out of the woods just yet, and the met office still has a yellow warning in place for when. that is until 9am this morning. that is because we are still expecting gusts of 60, 70 mph over the rush hour. sunny spells in blustery showers on the way. things calming down a little, but still quite windy day ahead of us. now, those showers are fairly scattered, few and far between. but as the day has on they could turn little bit wintry, temperatures getting up to about nine celsius. in most of the showers do tend to clear as we had through
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this evening, but it may be that ice and frost become an issue, as it turns much colder. temperatures down to freezing tonight. so frosty start to freezing tonight. so frosty start to tomorrow. again, some decent sunshine around. it may be one showers, but for many a largely dry day. still pretty blustery, though, as well. temperatures getting up to about five or six celsius. but a lot calmer on saturday. it is going to be drier, brighter, feeling fairly chilly, and quite frosty the start of the day. again, the same the sunday except a much more cloudy day, with some rain coming in from the west. and that is going to be fairly heavy at times, as well. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. music for the mind. we'll hear how the power of song is helping people with dementia,
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and growing up so quickly. research shows children really are getting taller. we'll speak to the school uniform makers who say their short trousers, aren't so short anymore. and she solved a problem like maria, now stage star connie fisher is contemplating motherhood. she'll be here to tell us about the personaljourney which has changed her attitude to becoming a parent. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. britain is to increase its contribution towards border controls in france by nearly a5 million pounds, and commit to taking in more migrants calais. the deal will be announced at a summit between theresa may and the french president emmanuel macron this afternoon.
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commuters in scotland and northern england are being warned about treacherous driving conditions this morning. an amber weather warning following heavy snow has been lifted. gales and heavy rain have been affecting other areas. police scotland have adviced that travel conditions across much of the country are extremely dangerous after heavy snowfall. a yellow weather warning for strong winds up to 75mph has been issued for much of england and wales. the public spending watchdog says taxpayers could face a bill of almost 200 billion pounds for deals signed under private finance initiatives. the national audit office's report into pfis — schemes where the government can borrow from private firms to build facilities like schools and hospitals — found more than 700 deals, with annual charges of more than 10 billion pounds, are still operational. the government says pfi has helped fund vital infrastructure projects. pa rents parents in england are subsidising free nursery ca re parents in england are subsidising free nursery care because it hasn't
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been properly funded by the government according to a survey published today. the report, by the pre—school learning alliance, found nurseries providing 30 hours of free childcare are having to ask parents to cover the cost of nappies and lunches. the government says the funding was never intended to cover the cost of meals or additional services and it is investing 6 billion pounds in childcare by 2020. the only person that this policy is free to as the government. it is not free to providers. we are subsidising this policy. it is not free to the parents of their children because we are having to ask for additional contributions to cover parts of what we offer that the funding does not cover. we would love the word free to be replaced by funded or subsidised. there are calls for all women over 30 to be screened for a faulty gene related to high rates of breast and a very and cancer. testing is said to prevent thousands of patients developing cancer and be
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cost—effective for the nhs. patient safety in accident and emergency units in wales is being compromised to an "unacceptable degree" according to hospital consultants. a group of a6 doctors is warning of the risks in a letter sent to the first minister. monthly performance figures will be published later this morning. nhs wales say it's been a very challenging winter, but things are starting to improve. the actor peter wyngarde, who played the flamboyant 60s crime—fighterjason king, has died aged 90. wyngarde shot to fame in the series "department s" but was also a prolific stage actor and director. his agent described him as the most extraordinary man he had ever met. has got news from the tennis. tennis at the top. joanna contura looking rather miffed as rightly she would.
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knocked out of the australian open in the second round. she is ninth seed. —— jon hannah konta. she had a terrible end to last season. she had a bit of an injury, recovered from that, got a new coach, a fresh beginning tojo konta. something we nt beginning tojo konta. something went wrong this time around. was it a convincing loss? the british number one and ninth seed is out of the australian open, knocked out in straight sets by bernarda pera who's ranked world number 123, beating konta in straight sets 6—a, 7—5. konta struggled with the very hot conditions in melbourne but afterwards described the result as not a "massive catastrophe". it's a bit frustrating but also i think, i'm still taking good stuff from this. i don't feel by any means
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that it from this. i don't feel by any means thatitis from this. i don't feel by any means that it is a massive catastrophe. obviously, i play every event to be there till the end. i don't want to be going home this early. i think in terms of building myself back up again and building myself up again, and playing the way i want to play, i think and playing the way i want to play, ithinki and playing the way i want to play, i think i keep moving forward. video refereeing came under the spotlight last night at stamford bridge as chelsea beat norwich city 5—3 on penalties in a dramatic fa cup 3rd round replay. chelsea took the lead in the match before jamal lewis equalised for norwich in the fourth minute of injury time — sending the match to extra time. willian then went down in the penalty area but the incident wasn't reviewed by var and he was instead booked for diving. chelsea had pedro and alvaro morata sent off so they were down to 9 men but eden hazard scored the winning penalty. chelsea will now play newcastle united in the fourth round but manager antonio conte
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was bemused by the willian decision. if you watch the replay, you can see very clearly that this is penalty. the referee looks and then he listen, he heard what the other referee watched. and then he say to continue to play. the shock of the night in the fa cup though came at league one side wigan. they beat premier league side bournemouth — sam morsey gave them the lead inside 10 minutes and they never looked back. their reward for the 3 nil win is a fourth round home tie against west ham. it was a good performance for us tonight, playing in such a good opposition. bournemouth, playing a good game, scoring goals of the right time, it allowed us to defend
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deep, pushing back, the lads, it was a fantastic game, goals frost to score, great to be in it. swansea, who are bottom of the premier league, beat wolves who are top of the championship — 2—1 thanks in part to a fanstastic goal from jordan ayew. swansea face league 2 notts county side away next. theo walcott is the second signing of the january transfer window. he is believed to have cost £20 million. ben stokes says he's "extremely delighted" to be available for selection again for england. the ecb say he is available for their tour of new zealand. their decision comes just 2 days after he was charged with affray following an incident outside a nightclub in bristol last september. he was left out of the ashes tour because of the ongoing police investigation. nasser hussain is particularly outspoken about the fact that he perhaps shouldn't be available for
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selection now that he has been charged for a criminal offence but before, he wasn't across selection. what kind of message does that sand? has anything happened, you can't come? now we know something has happened and you have to go and defend yourself in court. a bit of a controversial decision. eddiejones will name his england squad for the six nations later after announcing yesterday that he's agreed to stay on as england's rugby union head coach until 2021. that's a two—year extension to his current contract that was due to end after the 2019 world cup in japan. he'll remain in charge after that world cup and will be responsible for developing his successor during the following season. for me, i can do something quite selfless you for english rugby and i think i am indebted to england for the opportunity. i got to coach the national team and it's way of me something back. we mentioned jones naming his
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england squad today — but james haskell will miss england's first two six nations matches against italy and wales after being given a four—week ban. the wasps player was sent off for a dangerous tackle onjamie roberts during saturday's defeat to harlequins. it seems england did a lease score one victory in the recent ashes series. australia batsman david warner has posted a video on his instagram account of his daughter singing her favourite cricket song — only it isn't one that he would have expected. that is david warner's daughter singing "jimmyjimmy anderson". that is the legacy for australian cricket. all kinds of positives coming out to the australians after
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the ashes but the one thing david warner's daughter remembers is a song aboutjimmy anderson. see you later on. hollywood actress angelina jolie had her breasts, ovaries and fallopian tubes removed when she found out she carried a gene that would make her more susceptible to developing cancer. now, new research says giving every woman over 30 genetic tests for cancer risk would save lives and be cost effective for the nhs. let's talk to the lead researcher, dr ra njit manchanda. he's a consultant gynaecological oncologist. thank you that talking to us this morning. so tell me, who would you like to see screen? the research shows that it compares to strategies. the current strategy which cancer testing like the genes
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for brca one and two is offered base on the pattern of family history of cancer in the family. if it feel certain criteria protesting, they can avail this test. in the new strategy, we can explore the option of offering testing for everybody. this analysis compares the cost in consequence of doing this. we find that we can say a large number of lives and preventable cancers if we prevent a strategy of opting to test everybody. is this a stage that we are out, that it has to be justified ona are out, that it has to be justified on a cost basis? anything we do need to be justified on on a cost basis? anything we do need to bejustified on a cost on a cost basis? anything we do need to be justified on a cost basis and outcome basis. we feel we estimate a
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large number of people may not fulfil the current criteria protesting. therefore, they will be missed by the current approach. the new strategy offers us the opportunity to identify women at risk, often options in training and prevention and save more lives. why the age of 30? usually the risk of cancer doesn't rise before the age of 30. it is a pragmatic choice to the analysis. in this paper and this analysis. which cancers in particular will be more diagnosed or will we see a significant difference. for example, individuals
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carrying the faulty brca chants —— the faulty brca gene will have an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer and this contrasts with the population level risk which is about 1296. population level risk which is about 12%. if you know people at high risk, we can offer them options of more enhanced screening or prevention in the form of surgery to reduce the risk of ovarian cancer. to prevent breast cancer or that matter, using drugs. for preventing breast cancer. there are a range of approaches or options to reduce their cancer risk we know they are at high risk. this will prevent cancers and reduce the burden of disease in the population. thank you
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very much thejoining disease in the population. thank you very much the joining us from our london studio. all eyes are on the weather this morning. let's get the full update with matt. if you haven't had the snow, maybe you have had high winds and heavy rain. plenty going on this morning, some of you contending that scenes like this. very strong winds brought down trees in england and wales, but that is only part of the story. this system has brought windy weather rattling across quite quickly, and here earlier on we saw lots of snow. it is having an impact on the sort of routes across the north of england, the far south of scotland, especially considering where we have had seven inches of snow in some areas overnight. that will have an ongoing impact into the rush—hour, so check your travel news before you head out this morning. and these are the wind gusts in the last hour in
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parts of eastern england. over 60 mph for many. not particular common inland, that is causing some problems if you are travelling around. over the next couple of hours parts of lincolnshire and east anglia could see damaging gusts of wind, may be reaching 80 mph. so check before you head out, take it easy on the roads and pavements. in the west the winds easing down from the west the winds easing down from the strong showers overnight. showers now starting to push back into north—west england once again. that will turn to snow over higher ground. the legacy of icy conditions across northern ireland and much of scotla nd across northern ireland and much of scotland following plunging temperatures overnight and the showers keep going throughout the day. a mixture of sleep around some coasts. snow inland, a further coating of snow. the same tyres on the hills of northern england. eastern scotland should stay dry. much of eastern england will have a dry day. a few showers towards the south and west. these will be heavy with hail and thunder, a little bit of sleep extent, and wherever you are, even though the winds easing down after a peak this morning, it
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will still feel pretty chilly in the breeze. a noticeable wind chill for all. it stays breezy through the night. weather winds for latest across eastern areas, the greater chance of across some parts of central and southern england. the showers keep going in the west. most accumulating over parts of central western scotland and northern ireland in the west. most accumulating over parts of central western scotland and northern ireland into friday morning. so it will be very slippery in places here and across parts of northern england, wales as well. still a few showers to come across england and wales through the day. what's to come in western scotland and northern ireland. another blustery day, one or two spots avoiding the showers and staying with the sunshine. these are the temperatures on thermometers. it will feel colder than that in the wind. a bit of a different day on saturday. the winds are little bit lighter. that means a widespread and quite sharp frost to begin with, especially in northern areas. most will be dry. increasing cloud in the south—west towards the
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afternoon and that is the sign for a big change on sunday. if you have outdoor plants, saturday is the better day. it is going to be some snow, especially over the hills of southern scotland and northern england. that will turn back to rain and for many it will be a bit of a 5°99y and for many it will be a bit of a soggy day on sunday, but gradually turning mother. that is how it is looking. —— turning milder. china is one of our biggest trading partners, and the government wants us to do more business the country after we leave the eu. but its economy has been slowing down. ben is looking at how what it could mean for us. it is not often we talk about china, at they are a really big trading partner for us, at they are a really big trading partnerfor us, so at they are a really big trading partner for us, so what happens there will affect us as well. made in china is a pretty familiar label on the goods we buy. $a0 billion worth of goods imported from there to us each year. economists suggest the chinese economy could be growing by 6.7% in the last quarter of last year. the book that into a bit of context year. the book that into a bit of co ntext — — year. the book that into a bit of
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context —— to put that into a bit of context, it is growing much faster than canada, the fastest growing economy in the g7, much faster than the world's biggest economy, america, and of course much stronger than the growth we have seen in the uk. jinny yan, chief china economist at icbc standard bank. good morning to you. let's talk about these numbers, because when you see a figure like 6.7, 6.8%, phenomenal growth compared to the 1% or 2% we phenomenal growth compared to the 1% or2% we are phenomenal growth compared to the 1% or 2% we are seeing in europe and the us. why is it growing so quickly? you have to put in context, first of all china is used to double—digit growth so this is a slowdown from recent trends. in terms of momentum, china is growing very fast at the moment it is the old industries are not slowing down as much as people expected. but the new industries, the technology driven, innovative and creative industries, are coming up. that is why in terms of china, we have very sta ble why in terms of china, we have very stable consumer confidence, as well.
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investment, consumption and net export are also contributing positively towards gdp growth. that is why we have that positive figure out of china. so what does it mean in the uk? as you touched on, the government said we should be selling more to china. what can we sell to china? first of all we need to understand the rebalancing of china's economy. what china needs right now is that knowledge—based added value. so china is no longer the factory floor, the cheap stuff, out of china. it is about the extra knowledge base. so the uk is brilliant at that, and very experienced at the creative industries, innovation, and also financial technology, for example. those are just some examples, so the uk needs to embrace that and also try to really encouraged chinese demand into the uk. what are the things that are holding back trade at the moment? i mean, there is a lot of cultural issues that take a
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lot of cultural issues that take a lot of cultural issues that take a lot of understanding between the two countries. but other things that are holding back china buying more from the uk? they are obviously looking around the world saying where do we wa nt to around the world saying where do we want to buy from? what would make them choose the uk? well, first of all, as a trading partner, of course, europe is much bigger as an overall trading partner for china. but the uk needs to be playing to its strength. and its advantages, and really be dynamic in terms of what china demands from the uk. i think those are key factors there. and let's talk about that number itself. there is always a criticism when we get a growth figure from china, can we believe the number? is it actually accurate? a lot of people say it is made up. is it? there is some recent news about local provincial data being made up, but that is not news. we have seen that especially out of the financial crisis, and local figures that especially out of the financial crisis, and localfigures usually don't add up the national figures, and the official statistics agency has acknowledged that they are
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revising the figures so they are helping the regional provinces to come up with their gdp figures. so the first step is to acknowledge that problem. the second step is to address it, and i think we will see more of that in 2018. thank you for explaining all of that. and we are going to get that figure in nine minutes, so we will have that for you a little later. you sounded like you a little later. you sounded like you might be excited about that. yes, it is not often we get to talk about china on this programme. yes, it is not often we get to talk about china on this programmem yes, it is not often we get to talk about china on this programme. it is very rare we get to see how tall you are. 6—foot 6.5? very rare we get to see how tall you are. 6-foot 6.5? 6-foot 6.5, the half is very important. did you have trouble getting school uniforms to fit? because i grew out of it very quickly, as well. mum and dad were never thrilled. take a look. how old
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are you that? i was 11, that was the first day at secondary school, with my sister. look how big the uniform is. clearly mum was making sure i had room to grow into it. are used to work in a school uniform shop in myjob was to size up kids. you had to look at a child and it was a mission of diplomacy, because you had to please the parents as well as please the kids. so you would never be put in anything bigger than to size —— two sizes too big. be put in anything bigger than to size -- two sizes too big. is your sister also told? pretty toll, so she would be in herfinal year, so she would be in herfinal year, so she was a prefect or something, with that sash, and i was starting at secondary school, and yes, it is plenty of space to fit in. and look at my blonde hair, as well! i don't think i have changed a bit. well, we
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are not just think i have changed a bit. well, we are notjust doing this for nostalgia. the story is that children are getting taller and taller. we are talking about children getting taller this morning, after the country's leading school uniform manufacturer said demand for longer—length trousers, blazers and skirts is soaring. of course, children growing tall is not an entirely new phenomenon. how can i help you? we need trousers forjake. most of our 11 -year-olds are probably the size of the 12 or 13—year—old. i don't do very many small sizes now, probably two, three ina year. small sizes now, probably two, three in a year. most small sizes are what we call regular sizes now. had a growth spurt, they both have. a couple of years ago, at this size, he will have a bully would have been
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exceptionally tall in his class. now he is much more in line with other boys his age. has he stopped growing yet? no, definitely not! paul ryan shrinking. he has grown steadily a centimetre a month for the last 18 months or so. so yes, i would like him to stop now, please. —— or i am shrinking. dr latifa patel is a paediatrician. shejoins us now. so anecdotally is one thing. what is the evidence? what are we seeing? 0k, the evidence? what are we seeing? ok, you talk about why children grow. we have genetics, which we can't influence, you have diet and disease. those are the two things we have got better at doing. so better diet, and we don't start in childhood. we start way before, when a woman becomes pregnant we give antenatal advice, stop smoking, limit your alcohol intake, healthy eating, vitamins, and babies get their own midwife and you have
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pharmacists helping out, gps, you talk about supplementing the vitamins. generally as a nature nation we are eating better. you know the traffic light system? we informing parents and children better, and if you talk about disease prevention, we are as a nation getting better at that. to clarify, that would make us healthier, but why would it make us bigger? well, if you have the right nutrients in the right environment and you are tackling disease and ill—health, you are likely to grow and flourish. children are also getting bigger, they are becoming more overweight and more obese. that is different, isn't it? because you are talking about having good nutrition, well fed, with the right stuff. it is the wrong nutrition, or the wrong food habits, that causes obesity, obviously, and ill—health. absolutely, but we also find that children who are overweight or obese tend to be taller. so when uniforms
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are getting longer, they are properly also getting larger in terms of waist size. isn't it down to genetics? i was always going to end up no bigger than i am now. my pa rents a re end up no bigger than i am now. my parents are fairly short. it is absolutely partly to do with genetics, but in terms of what we can do, give your children the right diet from day one, give them the right food, nutrients, vitamins, and also think, the start of the nhs was also think, the start of the nhs was a turning point for the uk and how we surveill ill—health. now we know you go to your gp, your pharmacist, out hours care, a&e, and that has changed in the last 30 yearsm this a good news story?|j changed in the last 30 yearsm this a good news story? i think it is, in terms of general health and we well—being it is good news. we will only find out in the next ten or 20 years what really happened.
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obesity is something we need to look at. continuing the good work in terms of diet is really important. thank you very much for your time this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. a man has been charged with murdering a a1—year—old woman. natalie hastings died in hospital on tuesday. her family say she was a beautiful soul, with a big heart. a8—year—old simon whittle has been accused of murder, assaulting a police officer, and damaging police property. he has been remanded in custody. the streets of the capital will be turned into a vast night—time art exhibition for the lumiere london festival. more than 50 artists have created installations which will light up central london. you will not be able to miss it if you are anywhere near the west end, king's cross,
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westminster, victoria, the south bank or fitzrovia — all areas where exhibits are being shown for the next four evenings. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube: severe delays on northern line and london overground — part suspended. the wind is causing big problems on the trains this morning. greater anglia has delays on trains between liverpool street and norwich. chiltern services are disrupted between aylesbury and harrow—on—the—hill. southern trains are suspended between uckfield and oxted. south—eastern trains are disrupted via hayes. south—western railway services have been suspended between guildford and havant, following two trees on the line. there is also disruption on services between alton and aldershot. and trains in and out of king's cross running with delays of up to 50 minutes, due to speed restrictions. on the roads: a13 has the usual delays from dagenham into town, towards barking. at the dartford river crossing, the qe2 bridge is closed due to this morning's strong winds, with traffic in both directions diverted via the dartford tunnels. let's have a check on the weather
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now, with georgina burnett. good morning. well, after a rather turbulent night last night, things should be easing a little today. but we're not out of the woods just yet, and the met office still has a yellow warning in place for wind, that's until 9:00am this morning. that's because we're still expecting gusts of 60—70 mph over the rush hour. sunny spells and blustery showers on the way. things calming down a little, but still quite a windy day ahead of us. now, those showers are fairly scattered, few and far between. but as the day wears on, they could turn little bit wintry, temperatures getting up to about nine degrees celsius. and most of the showers do tend to clear as we head through this evening, but it may be that ice and frost become an issue, as it turns much colder. temperatures down to freezing tonight, so a frosty start to tomorrow. again, some decent sunshine around. there may be one or two showers, but for many a largely dry day. temperatures getting up to about five or six degrees
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celsius, but a lot calmer on saturday. it's going to be drier, brighter, feeling fairly chilly, and quite frosty to start off the day. again, the same for sunday, except a much more cloudy day, with some rain coming in from the west. and that's going to be fairly heavy at times, as well. there are travel bulletins every 15 minutes on bbc radio london, telling you all about the travel situation because of the wind. i am back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour, and we will see you soon. hello — this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. boosting french border controls and taking in more migrants from calais — the prime minister will announce a new agreement with france today. as theresa may hosts president emmanuel macron, she'll say almost £a5 million will be spent beefing up security around the channel. good morning — it's
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thursday the 18th january. also this morning: a third day of snow, and a night of strong winds continue to cause hazardous conditions. we saw seven inches of snow last night. in lincolnshire in east anglia, 80 miles an hour winds. the flagship government scheme giving 30 hours of "free" childcare in england isn't working — one charity says parents are having to subsidise it from their own pockets. taxpayers owe private companies — like carillion — almost 200 billion pounds to complete big building projects — and the public spending watchdog says it's not the best value for money. in sport — curtains for konta. the british number one is out of the australian open after a shock defeat to the world number 123.
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and helping people with dementia through the power of song and why there are calls for more people to be have access to it. good morning. first, our main story. britain is to increase its contribution towards border controls in france by nearly a5 million pounds, and commit to taking in more migrants calais. the deal will be announced at a summit between theresa may and the french president emmanuel macron this afternoon. their meeting — at the army's officer training academy in sandhurst — is being seen as the most important for several years, as our diplomatic correspondent, james robbins, reports. this summit is very deliberately being held at sandhurst, britain's military academy of officer cadets. the venue underlined the fact that britain and france are the key military powers in europe, used to working together and today committing to greater co—operation, even if the background to all of this is,
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of course, brexit. and in other ways britain and france are heading into very different directions. under pressure from president macron, theresa may will take in some migrant stuck in calais and desperate across the channel. so expect more unaccompanied children to be allowed into britain, as well as adults who successfully argued that their ad mission will reunify families. but the longer—term deals will focus on defence. britain is sending three british chinook helicopters to mali — they are large troop carrying aircraft that the french badly lack in their fight against islamists. britain will broaden its military presence in that area. in return, france will back up troops british forces in the baltic state of estonia, where they are confronting a possible russian threat.
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let's speak now to our reporter ian palmer. he's at sandhurst, where the meeting will take place this afternoon. a very good morning to you. tells about the meetings in what is on the agenda. the meeting really is the backdrop being brexit and the continuing relationship between france and the united kingdom. the £aa.5 million will be used for cctv fencing and detection systems and outcomes on top of the £100 billion the government says it has already spent on board —— border security in northern france. when theresa may and a manual macron meatier, it will be the first time the intelligence services from great britain meet with their french counterparts to talk about domestic and international terrorism. —— emmanuel macron. it will be the 35th summit
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where emmanuel macron has shown his death is negotiating skills. you will have seen those headlines about him agreeing to loan the tapestry in principle. he needs theresa may to get his immigration laws to work and mrs may needs a major eu player as an ally as britain goes into the second play —— second phase of brexit talks. commuters in scotland and northern england are being warned about treacherous driving conditions this morning. an amber weather warning following heavy snow has been lifted. gales and heavy rain have been affecting other areas. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon is in lanarkshire with the latest for us this morning. you can see the snow behind you and see some traffic moving. there are warnings in place, as we said. there we re warnings in place, as we said. there were fewer incidents overnight. no
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repeat of that situation on tuesday night. hundreds of drivers were stranded on this stretch. as you say, this morning, the traffic is moving slowly. it is an interesting situation overnight. i think drivers we re situation overnight. i think drivers were heeding the warning, that really heavy—duty warning, not to travel if at all possible in the areas were the worst of the weather was forecast. this road, which is the main link road, between scotland, was almost deserted for a fleet of critters. i think that helped the situation. perhaps the weather here was not quite as bad as forecast. there is still a lot of snow. it might be a slightly
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different situation. there is still a warning in place. one other thing to note is the borders of the schools there will be closed for a second day. the public spending watchdog says taxpayers could face a bill of almost 200—billion pounds for deals signed under private finance initiatives. pfis cover companies like carillion — and the national audit office says there are more than 700 deals still in place. ben is here to explain more. how much is being paid to outsource work. and how safe these deals are. in the way of that collapse this week, a lot of attention placed on how these deals actually work. who has paid what. watch projects have been built. build that school, that
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road, that railway and we will pay you money to lease it back. maybe the 30 or a0 years. the report was done before the collapse. finding out we are paying £10 billion per year just to service the out we are paying £10 billion per yearjust to service the zig 16 contracts. even if we signed no new deals today, we would still be paying £200 billionjust to keep the payments going. pfis are an expensive way of building infrastructure. organisations like the nhs are held on these rigid contracts. the government has always been a big fan of these of late and says this is a way of offsetting the cost, building and maintenance of these projects. but essentially what this study looks at is saying it costs more than it should and that
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the returns are not as great. something we are going to talk about for a long time. parents in england are subsidising free nursery care because it hasn't been properly funded by the government — that's according to a survey published today. since september, parents working more than 16 hours a week have been able to claim 30 hours of free childcare. but a majority of nurseries say they're struggling to cover costs, and are asking parents to pay for lunches and nappies. the government says it is investing 6 billion pounds in childcare by 2020. elaine dunkley reports. how many of the pink beads have we got? at sparkling stars pre—school in poole, the numbers do not add up. it is struggling financially provide children with 30 hours of free care each week, and says the government has not provided enough funding for the scheme. the only person that this policy is free to is the government. it's not free to providers. we're subsidising this policy. it's not free to parents, or their children, because we're having to ask for additional contributions to cover parts of what we offer, that
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the funding does not cover. we would love the word "free" to be replaced by "funded" or "subsidised." the scheme to double free childcare for three— and four—year—olds from 15 hours per week to 30 was introduced last september. but, with nurseries now struggling, families are being asked to pick up additional costs. the report from the pre—school learning alliance suggests only 35% of childcare providers are delivering 30 hours per week completely free. 37% have introduced or increased charges for things such as meals and snacks, to make up the shortfall. 38% of providers are uncertain whether they will be offering 30—hour places in one year's time. when they go on to bigger schools, you are not expected to make donations and things there. it should be free for everybody. the department for education said it has always been clear that the government funding is not intended to cover the cost of meals or additional services, and while providers can charge parents for additional extras, this cannot be a condition of each child's place. there are calls for all women over the age of 30 to be screened
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for a faulty gene linked to higher rates of breast and ovarian cancer. research by the barts cancer institute in london found testing would prevent thousands of cancers, and be cost—effective for the nhs. patient safety in accident and emergency units in wales is being compromised to an "unacceptable degree" according to hospital consultants. a group of a6 doctors is warning of the risks in a letter sent to the first minister. monthly performance figures will be published later this morning. nhs wales say it's been a very challenging winter, but things are starting to improve. the actor peter wyngarde, who played the flamboyant 60s crime—fighterjason king, has died aged 90. wyngarde shot to fame in the series "department s" but was also a prolific stage actor and director. ben ando looks back on his life. i'd offer you a glass of champagne.
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it is really bad view in small doses. peter wyngarde is jason king, the louche crime—fighting novelist with a handlebar moustache and a whiskey or cigarette permanently on hand. he enjoyed numerous minor roles but all that changed when department s hit television screens in 1969. his characters kaleidoscopic wardrobe largely, it is set, designed by peter wyngarde himself, captured the mood and turned him into a star. there was a spin—off series and album, stage roles and films but as the 70s closed, work was hard to come by. peter wyngarde battled alcoholism at the height of his career, telling an interviewer in the 90s he was amazed he was still alive. he died at the chelsea and winston store hospital. his agent said it was an indescribable loss as peter wyngarde was by far the most extraordinary
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man he had ever met. let's go back to our main story. le stitch up. that's how some newspapers have described the idea that the uk could pay an extra a5 million pounds to beef up security at calais and other channel ports. in return, french president emmanuel macron is expected to confirm that france will loan britain the bayeux tapestry — but not until at least 2020. so is britain being short—changed? let's speak to the conservative mp tom tugendhat, who chairs the commons foreign affairs committee. good morning to you. could you outline what you think these talks are about. brexit looms large over everything. what is on the table today? first of all, there is no trade between the loan of the bayeux ta pestry trade between the loan of the bayeux tapestry and where the border is in
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calais. the two are completely unconnected. why did the french president make the announcement?m going around the world and making grand gestures. he's done so with the americans and emma ratti ‘s and the chinese and is also bringing up matters he wishes to talk about. —— those from the emirates. but try to ca ptu re those from the emirates. but try to capture the attention of those you are talking to the loan of the bayeux tapestry has been negotiated for several months by the british embassy. it's a fantastic achievement by our ambassador to secure such a mixed ordinary item for the british museum. having got the attention, is going to bring up the attention, is going to bring up the subject he was bringing up a nyway the subject he was bringing up anyway including the location of the border. including economic cooperation. to connect the two is com pletely cooperation. to connect the two is completely wrong. i mean, i'm sorry but the way you describe it, sounds
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like a trade, trade is an official title but it sounds like it's a nice gesture. he will be wanting something in return. no, no, no, no, no, no. he will be wanting something anyway, with or without the gesture. the gesture is merely a gesture. if you don't want the bayeux tapestry, don't take the bayeux tapestry. he will still want to trade. what i am saying is that people listening to you, they will decide for themselves at home what they make of the gesture. let's move on to the substantive issue. the discussion on calais began about 1.5 — two years ago, a long time before anyone had brought up a conversation about a loa n brought up a conversation about a loan or not. the key element is we have several things to talk about with president emmanuel macron of france, and they are to do with our
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post—brexit cooperation, and that is to do with things like border controls, of course, because we will no longer be in the single market, we will no longer be in the customs union, so we will have to have a different form of order. we will have to talk about how we do military co—operation, because we have been talking about that for many years, and we will have to talk about economic co—operation because we will no longer be in the single market in the customs union and we are very market in the customs union and we are very important trading partners. we have been talking about those things ever since emmanuel macron was elected in the last french president was talking about them as well, so they are completely unconnected. explain to me, if you can, the situation in relation to migrants, because as we understand it, one of the issues on the table is the notion we would accept more migrants as part of a deal or arrangement over how the borders work. well, look, there have been various proposals on this but it is hardly surprising that the french government is putting out proposals
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which suggest we bear more of the burden of the migrants in calais, and we finally enough are saying that actually this should be shared ina that actually this should be shared in a different way. so this is one of the things we will have to talk about, but i think the proposals you have seen in the newspapers reflect the french position rather more strongly than they reflect the british position, and i would be surprised if we were to end up with the proposals as you have seen them in the newspapers so far. i think what you are actually going to see isa what you are actually going to see is a much fairer system of sharing the burden, and making sure that the french also take on quite a lot of the migrants. in fact, the won has been pretty clear on one thing, which is that too many of charities in calais have been encouraging migrants to apply for refugee status in the united kingdom, and they should in fact be applying for it in france. and that is the president himself who said it, not one of our negotiators, so i would hope that our negotiators are indeed reflecting that opinion. there are sensitivities about this in relation to brexit. ma assuming that the
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situation for theresa may is that it is untenable for her to come out of a meeting with emmanuel macron saying that yes, we will accept more migrants, given the wider picture? no, the prime minister is a strategic thinker, and what she will be doing is she will be weighing up the entire relationship, and working out what is best to the united kingdom out of the whole relationship, not just kingdom out of the whole relationship, notjust out of one single item. so there may be some give and take in a few areas in order to get a bigger benefits somewhere else. and that is what she will be doing. she is an extremely impressive negotiator, as we have seen by the very fact that when she was home secretary she was absolutely rigorous getting people out of the country, she was absolutely rigorous when she negotiated with the french then, and in fact it is largely down to her negotiations that the calais position has been maintained so successfully when she was home secretary, and now what she is going to be doing is weighing up that
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position but also balancing it with the fact that because we are no longer going to be in the single market or the customs union, which is of course what people voted for when they voted to leave the european union, that is going to change the relationship. so we are going to have to rethink pretty much everything, actually, as we re—evaluate that bilateral relationship. and if! could, just briefly, one significant meeting todayis briefly, one significant meeting today is a meeting of many of the security forces from both the uk and from france, and this is a meeting which hasn't really happened before in this way. can you briefly explain that to us? well, look, what france and britain have had massive co—operation over many years, indeed, i was a soldier when we were helping with the mali operation in 2013 and libya in 2011, and those periods of negotiation when we worked so incredibly closely in france on two makes significant areas have grown up and grown up, and we now have the joint task force
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which is an anglo—french deployable unit. we have enormous amount of intelligence sharing and intelligence sharing and intelligence co—operation. what this is doing is bringing all that together so instead of having just the intelligence agencies meeting their opposite numbers and the soldiers and sailors and air meant meeting their opposite numbers, we are bringing all that together —— airmen. what it shows, of course, is something we have always known. france values the relationship with the united kingdom enormously, and thatis the united kingdom enormously, and that is what the loan of the bayeux ta pestry that is what the loan of the bayeux tapestry shows as well. it shows that france considers this to be one of its most important relationships in the world. it is something we should welcome, but we should not be over flattered by it, should welcome, but we should not be overflattered by it, because it is true that our relationship is incredibly close an incredibly important to both of us, and we have now both got a responsibility to make it work on every level. thank you very much for your time this morning. we will allow you to get a glass of water to help your throat.
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thank you for your time this morning. always annoying when those frogs appear at the most inopportune times. we need to talk about the weather. matt is taking a look at that. i understand it is the first time since around january 2013 that there has been this warning, do not travel, which has been applied, because the conditions on some of the road is really are treacherous. they certainly are. thankfully the worst is over as far as what is falling from the sky, but you can see the conditions of the roads. the weather system that came our way is rattling its way eastwards quite tricky. we just have to tailor but still sitting across parts of southern scotland and northern england, but if you notice it is leaving treacherous conditions on some of these routes in northern england and southern scotland and on the hills we have seen as much as seven inches of snow, fresh snow thatis, seven inches of snow, fresh snow that is, fall overnight. that is just one aspect of the story. other hazards have been weaned, severe gales through the night, bringing
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numerous trees down. this is the last few minutes in eastern england, the north norfolk coast hitting 70 or 80 mph. this is where we see the peak of the winds across parts of lincolnshire, east anglia, down towards kent the east of london. that will cause some further travel problems this morning. it is a dry, bright start here, however. when is nowhere near as strong as they as they were overnight but a blustery start bringing one or two showers. showers returning to north—east england, they will tend to follow snow over higher ground. i see in northern scotland and ireland will cause a few issues this morning. still a few showers to come in northern ireland and western scotland, a further covering of snow in places, a further centimetre or two of snow at times in the hills of northern england. further south, likely to be a mixture of thunder, rain and hail. many southern and eastern areas will get through the day dry. but wherever you are, still a chilly breeze even though it is easing down. it will fill sub zero
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throughout across parts of scotland and northern ireland. it stays blustery through the night. the showers keep going across many western areas, the ice risk will be there and further snow bacuna leading in parts of western scotland and northern ireland. it will be a bit more in these areas this coming night than you saw last night. saw widespread frost into tomorrow morning, even further south temperatures well below freezing and a few spots. a few showers here through the day, lots of showers in the west. the winds strong and gusty, touching gale force at times, and northern england, scotland and northern ireland more susceptible to a further covering of snow as we can see over the welsh hills. it will feel colder than temperatures suggest given the strength of the wind. into the weekend, the wind widespread and severe frost to begin with. one or two showers across northern parts in particular. the best day of the weekend, because saturday night in the sunday we see a band of cloud and rain pushing its way northwards and eastwards. it is going to meet the colder air, so in
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the sunday morning we could see snow over higher ground in scotland and northern england. as milder air pushes in, it will turn back the rain. it certainly over the next few hours at least the snow is easing through northern england, but the winds could still be damaging over the next hour in parts of lincolnshire and east anglia. i will keep you updated throughout the morning. music therapy is nothing new, but new evidence showing just how much it can help people with dementia will be presented to mps today. research shows it can help alleviate some of the condition's symptoms, and enhance a patient‘s quality of life, but experts say not enough care homes offer music sessions to their residents. breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. you see people come back to life. there's a great raising of self—esteem. in this hall in croydon, the singing for the brain choir meet each week. these are people with a diagnosis of dementia, and their carers. the people with the diagnosis
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realise they are equals again. they can do what everyone else is doing, in some cases better. for dad, it's the joy in his eyes, really. and look, look at him smiling. he loves it. music is for the soul, putting it lightly. music's ability to help people with dementia has been known for years, but many with the condition don't have access to groups like this. today, the international longevity centre will deliver the biggest report of its kind to the house of lords, calling for greater music provision, and a national framework to deliver it. we've all been hearing about how to decrease the use of antipsychotic medication, and music provides a really fantastic alternative. only 5% of care homes in the uk have good quality arts and music provision for their residents. we really want to see
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that increased. you don't have to perform music to reap the benefits, according to research in this report. just listening to it can have a hugely positive effect. you have a better memory for the music you listen to between the ages of ten and 30. so if you've got a relative with dementia, even if they can't communicate with you anymore, you can think back to when they would have been ten to 30 years old, and use that as a key to unlock the kinds of music that they might really enjoy, and might have a lot of benefits for them. have you got a favourite song? what, for you? que sera sera! you like that one, don't you? dot has dementia. her husband, george, says this choir transforms her. i said we're going singing. she said, oh, can't wait to get here. yes, i loved every bit of it. more than 30 years ago, paul hardcastle raised awareness of another issue — the treatment of vietnam veterans.
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his song 19 was a global hit. now, he is calling on the music industry to do more to help people with dementia, by offering free performances and personalised playlists. the main thing about this is there is no downside to actually using music. it's not like we're asking people to test new drugs. you know, it's been proven beyond doubt that this is working, and the music industry is big enough to really help out, and i think it should be. a message to be delivered with unified voice — help music help more people. and itjust works, doesn't it? we will be talking about it a little bit later, so if you want to share your experiences, do so. it is amazing how much music can touch the hearts of so many people. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news,
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i'm victoria hollins. a man has been charged with murdering a a1—year—old woman after a traffic collision in hemel hempstead, in hertfordshire. natalie hastings died in hospital on tuesday. her family say she was a beautiful soul, with a big heart. a8—year—old simon whittle has been accused of murder, assaulting a police officer, and damaging police property. he has been remanded in custody. the streets of the capital will be turned into a vast night—time art exhibition for the lumiere london festival. more than 50 artists have created installations which will light up central london. you will not be able to miss it if you are anywhere near the west end, king's cross, westminster, victoria, the south bank or fitzrovia — all areas where exhibits are being shown for the next four evenings. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube: minor delays on northern line, and london overground part suspended between wandsworth road and clapham junction.
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the wind is causing big problems on the trains this morning. greater anglia has delays on trains between liverpool street and norwich. chiltern trains are disrupted between aylesbury and harrow—on—the—hill. southern trains are suspended between uckfield and oxted. south—eastern trains are disrupted via hayes. south—western railway services have been suspended between guildford and havant, following two trees on the line. there is also disruption on services between alton and aldershot. c2c trains via ockenden are also affected. and trains in and out king's cross running with delays of up to 50 minutes, due to speed restrictions. on the roads: heading through wapping, there are westbound delays for traffic on the highway and east smithfield, due to overrunning works. at the dartford river crossing, the qe2 bridge is closed due to this mornings strong winds, with traffic in both directions diverted via the dartford tunnels. let's have a check on the weather now, with georgina burnett. good morning. well, after a rather turbulent night last night, things should be easing a little today. but we're not out of the woods just
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yet, and the met office still has a yellow warning in place for wind, that's until 9:00am this morning. that's because we are still expecting gusts of 60—70 mph over the rush hour. sunny spells and blustery showers on the way. things calming down a little, but still quite a windy day ahead of us. now, those showers are fairly scattered, few and far between. but as the day heads on, they could turn little bit wintry, temperatures getting up to about nine degrees celsius. and most of the showers do tend to clear as we head through this evening, but it may be that ice and frost become an issue, as it turns much colder. temperatures down to freezing tonight. so a frosty start to tomorrow, again some decent sunshine around. there may be one or two showers, but for many a largely dry day. still pretty blustery, though, as well. temperatures getting up to about five or six degrees celsius, but a lot calmer on saturday. it's going to be drier, brighter, feeling fairly chilly, and quite frosty to start off the day. again, the same for sunday, except a much more cloudy day, with some rain coming in from the west, and that's going to be fairly heavy
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at times, as well. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. britain is to increase its contribution towards border controls in france by nearly a5 million pounds, and commit to taking in more migrants. the deal will be announced at a summit between theresa may and the french president emmanuel macron this afternoon. other commitments being unveiled include the deployment of three raf chinook helicopters to mali, where french forces are fighting islamic extremists, and the confirmation that france will loan britain the bayeux tapestry.
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commuters in scotland and northern england are being warned about treachorous driving conditions this morning. (pres) an amber weather warning following heavy snow —— an amber weather warning following heavy snow has been lifted. gales and heavy rain have been affecting other areas. our correspondent fiona trott is in cumbria for us. we can see a lot of snow on the ground. part of the road is closed because the conditions are very, very dangerous. here at the a66, it is closed eastbound. a lot of snow on the ground. 15 inches just south of here. notjust the snow, wind is a real problem as well. gusts of 70 miles per hour across the uk. in wales, 78. in central england, people are being warned because there will be gusts around 6a miles per hour in south lincolnshire later
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this morning. there are fallen trees across england. lincolnshire and derbyshire and norfolk and surrey and gloucestershire and cambridgeshire. police forces there are warning people to take extra claire —— extra care. passengers wa nt to claire —— extra care. passengers want to expect delays to from manchester. the very latest on the weather warnings. snow and ice warning until 11 o'clock this morning for scotland, northern ireland and here in northern england. thank you very much. please do check with your local weather services, local radio and on line just any changes to the updates on travel. we've talked a lot about retail this christmas — but this morning ben has an update from the royal mail and deliveries over christmas and it's a mixed picture? all those letters and cards and parcels, an update from them. 1a9
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million parcels sent in december. a lot of christmas presents going through the post. at the same time, it's that familiar tale. letters and cards. there was a 5% fall in how many cards. there was a 5% fall in how ma ny letters cards. there was a 5% fall in how many letters and cards we sent last year but a 6% rise in parcels. lots of companies that rival royal mail. we are collecting parcels differently. i thought that would have affected them. the baht -- they lost a big contract with amazon. but amazon has been doing its own thing. they have been trying to pick and parcels is the place they will make their money. not letters, because we are sending fewer. the owner of prime mark saying sales were up 7%. they are going to open 1.2 million square feet of retail space this
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year. that is really crucial. we talk about retail is being on line. they are opening 1.3 million square feet of floor space on the high street. the public spending watchdog says taxpayers could face a bill of almost 200 billion pounds for deals signed under private finance initiatives. the national audit office's report into pfis — schemes where the government can borrow from private firms to build facilities like schools and hospitals found more than 700 deals, with annual charges of more than 10 billion pounds, are still operational. the government says pfi has helped fund vital infrastructure projects. there are calls for all women over 30 to be screened for a faulty gene related to high rates of breast and a very and cancer. testing is said to prevent thousands of patients developing cancer and be cost—effective for the nhs. patient safety in accident and emergency units in wales is being compromised to an "unacceptable degree" according to hospital consultants.
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a group of a6 doctors is warning of the risks in a letter sent to the first minister. monthly performance figures will be published later this morning. nhs wales say it's been a very challenging winter, but things are starting to improve. matt will be here with the weather in a few moments. bad news tennis fans. johanna konta is out. five consecutive defeats. a new coach the 2018. she looked great in her first—round match. new coach the 2018. she looked great in herfirst—round match. she got through to the quarterfinals, the semifinals of wimbledon. a real hope
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of british tennis. it is not to be this year. maybe another year perhaps. the british number one and ninth seed is out of the australian open, knocked out in straight sets by bernarda pera who's ranked world number 123, beating konta in straight sets 6—a, 7—5. konta struggled with the very hot conditions in melbourne but afterwards described the result as not a "massive catastrophe". it's a bit frustrating but also i think, i'm still taking good stuff from this. i don't feel by any means that it is a massive catastrophe. obviously, i play every event to be there till the end. i don't want to be going home this early. i think in terms of building myself back up again and building myself up again, and playing the way i want to play, i think i keep moving forward. wimbledon and the end third seed
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garbine muguruza is out. novak djokovic needed for sets to be gael monfils. seeded 1ath following his return from an elbow injury. video refereeing came under the spotlight last night at stamford bridge as chelsea beat norwich city 5—3 on penalties in a dramatic fa cup 3rd round replay. chelsea took the lead in the match before jamal lewis equalised for norwich in the fourth minute of injury time — sending the match to extra time. willian then went down in the penalty area but the incident wasn't reviewed by var and he was instead booked for diving. chelsea had pedro and alvaro morata sent off so they were down to 9 men but eden hazard scored the winning penalty. chelsea will now play newcastle united in the fourth
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round but manager antonio conte was bemused by the willian decision. if you watch the replay, you can see very clearly that this is penalty. the referee looks and then he listen, he heard what the other referee watched. and then he say to continue to play. the shock of the night in the fa cup though came at league one side wigan. they beat premier league side bournemouth — sam morsey gave them the lead inside 10 minutes and they never looked back. their reward for the 3 nil win is a fourth round home tie against west ham. it was a good performance for us tonight, playing such a good opposition. bournemouth, playing a good game,
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scoring goals at the right time, it allowed us to defend deep, pushing back, the lads, it was a fantastic game, goals for us to score, great to be in it. swansea, who are bottom of the premier league, beat wolves who are top of the championship — 2—1 thanks in part to a fanstastic goal from jordan ayew. swansea face league 2 notts county side away next. ben stokes says he's "extremely delighted" to be available for selection again for england. the ecb say he is available for their tour of new zealand. their decision comes just 2 days after he was charged with affray following an incident outside a nightclub in bristol last september. he was left out of the ashes tour because of the ongoing police investigation. nasser hussain is particularly outspoken about the fact that he perhaps shouldn't be available for selection now that he has been charged for a criminal offence but before, he wasn't across selection. what kind of message does that sand? a bit of a controversial decision.
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eddiejones will name his england squad for the six nations later after announcing yesterday that he's agreed to stay on as england's rugby union head coach until 2021 . (tx 00v) that's a two year extension to his current contract that was due to end after the 2019 world cup injapan. he'll remain in charge after that world cup and will be responsible for developing his successor. and finally it seems england did at least score one victory in the recent ashes series. australia batsman david warner has posted a video on his instagram account of his daughter singing her favourite cricket song — only it isn't one that he would have expected. jimmyjimmy anderson!
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that is a little bit like the young son ofjoe that is a little bit like the young son of joe root that is a little bit like the young son ofjoe root growing up to sing songs about steve smith. some things you are not in control of. if he couldn't hear it, she was singing jimmyjimmy anderson. couldn't hear it, she was singing jimmy jimmy andersonlj couldn't hear it, she was singing jimmy jimmy anderson. i thought she was saying give me, give me. you don't watch in test cricket. it is just a coincidence. it was a key conservative manifesto pledge which came into force last september. thirty hours of free pre—school care for children aged three and four, providing both parents were in work and earning less than 100,000 pounds per year. but a survey of pre—school providers has found that
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many of them claim the government funding is not enough — and they're asking parents to make up the difference by paying for meals, snacks and nappies. we'll speak to a nursery owner in a moment. first let's hear what some parents had to say about it. it is costly, it is costly for working family, when you look at what the minimum wages, and the take the cost of the nursery. it is expensive and some of us, if we can help, we will help, and i have helped, but effectively, it should be free for everybody. when they go on to bigger schools, you are not asked to make donations. the young ones, why should it be any different really, especially when there are parents again. i think they should get all the help they can. my income fluctuates. i can't necessarily afford to book regular childcare sessions, if that makes sense. having the 30 hours gives me the
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security to be able to work more but obviously they can't sustain it, thatis obviously they can't sustain it, that is concerning. jennyjohnson owns chains of nurseries. you can tell is how the scheme is working in your nursery. six in yourgroup. scheme is working in your nursery. six in your group. is it working? how is it working? it's up to £5,000 discount but the issue is the positioning of the offer is 33 hours because it is not free. the parents, to get access to this childcare, are having to pay snacks and drinks. it makes is feel like we're having to pay for everything else in like the government to do is position mr pa rents of government to do is position mr parents of them to spend as they choose will whatever provided they choose will whatever provided they choose and that might provide them 1200 hrs, 1000 were hours with another. what did parents get when
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they popped their child into one of your nurseries? they still get the same offering. nappies and lunches, at cetera. they had the feed that they understood what they were paying for. the issue isn't the funding that they are providing, it's the fact that they are positioning three hours. the funding level is too low price, free example. every child, its £1800 less so we would have a shortfall of over half £1 million if the parents weren't willing to pay the difference. in areas of deprivation, some parents don't have the choice to have the difference paid and surely those of the children that need access to this more than any other children so the flaw in the system isjust the positioning, not the funding. we are grateful for the funding, just the positioning.
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you seem to be talking about the semantics. if the money is there, why does it matter whether it is called three or allocated ? why does it matter whether it is called three or allocated? if the money is the money, then how does what it is called make any difference? it is a very important point, so if as a parent you are told you can access 30 free hours, the new expectation is you can access 30 free hours. in what way is that not true? it is not true in that not true? it is not true in that it that not true? it is not true in thatitis that not true? it is not true in that it is highly likely you will have to pay for food, snacks and drinks. have someone who qualifies for the free childcare comes to one of your preschool centres, and they have 30 free hours a week, that is what it is... well, no, because it is 30 free hours the 37 weeks a year. so again, this is positioning issue. parents are expecting 30 free hours, but you stretch that over the
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year, and most parents want childcare all year round, it is more than that. and just explain what needs to be paid on top of what is being given by the government? they have created a backdoor, if you like, because they recognise the funding is not adequate to cover the cost of the childcare, so parents are having to pay these extras. that is fine if the parents are happy to pay it, and some parents are happy to pay it. what if the parents can't pay it? then they will struggle to find a provider who can offer them access to the three hours, because it is not free, and that is our only issue. if the government said to the pa rents, issue. if the government said to the parents, here is £5,000 towards your childcare, parents will be delighted, but the issue is the positioning of the offer. they need to be transparent with the positioning of the offer. that is what we are asking for. the funding being applied is £6 billion every year until 2020. what do you think
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it should be? if the £6 billion is all they have to offer, that is fantastic and the parents are benefiting from £6 billion. but give them £5,000 each to spend as they choose, rather than setting in expectation of 30 free hours a week. what they are actually getting as 11a0 hours a year, which is more like 20 hours a week. so again, it is dishonesty and poor positioning. those would be the free hours, those 20 hours a week. you're saying you can 20 hours a week completely free. all year round. what if you wanted those 30 hours, that is when the cost co m es those 30 hours, that is when the cost comes in. in this confusion is exactly the issue. parents are confused because the government is telling them 30 free hours a week. it is 1a30 hours a year. most pa rents it is 1a30 hours a year. most pa re nts wa nt it is 1a30 hours a year. most parents want childcare throughout the year, which is an average. honestly, it is just positioning.
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great news for parents, they are getting £5,000 off theirfees. it is wonderful news, just position it properly and transparently. thank you for your time this morning. and thank you for your comments, we will get to those of that later on in the programme, time permitting. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. lots of snow reported in scotland over the past couple of days, and the weather conditions in the north of the country are pretty grim. that is beautiful blue sky, but heavy snow. it is, things are improving weather condition wise. whichever way you look at it in darlington, there is no overhead. overnight in northern england we saw as much as seven inches of snow fall over the hills. it is having a bit of an impact to those travelling around this morning. if i show you the radar chart through the early hours of this morning, the snow is quite extensive, affecting southern scotland. it has now eased away but all these routes have been impacted
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by it, and isis set to become the next major worry across parts of southern scotland and northern england. it is notjust the wet weather, it has been windy weather overnight. severe gales over much of england and wales. in the last hour it has been east anglia, lincolnshire, and towards essex and kent. peaking at the moment, they will ease as we go towards the back end of the rush—hour, but still gusty. a few trees down, that will have an impact on travel. check bbc local radio before you head out. a few showers in the west, punctuating the sunshine in south—west england and wales. heavy showers over parts of liverpool and merseyside, that will punch its weight in the north—west england, turning to snow over higher ground. showers in northern ireland and western scotland, and here, as well is northern england, it is a big price risk to take us through the next few hours. a big ice risk. other than the odd shower, most will have a predominantly dry day. when the peeking, as i say, at the moment. using down. showers in the west,
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rain, hailand thunder using down. showers in the west, rain, hail and thunder in the south—west of the country, but further north of further covering of snow. the winds will pick up here later on, and it will add to the windshield. another day with temperatures below freezing. the breeze will remain a feature as we go through the night. the odd shower getting further east. many southern and eastern areas will be dry, clear and eastern areas will be dry, clear and cold. a widespread frost tonight, and where you have seen showers through the day, i say big risk for tomorrow morning's rush—hour. and we could see yet more snow in western scotland, northern ireland in particular, giving further travel disruption. we'll see showers, sleet and snow across northern england, the hills of wales, further south. it is mainly rain, sleet and hail to content with. sharp frost developing, but that drives, brightest day of the weekend, especially the northern half of the country. lots of sunshine, increasing cloud and
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patchy rain towards the south—west. through saturday night in the sunday we get a real push on this weather front northwards and eastwards across the uk. that is set to bring across the uk. that is set to bring a spell of snow across the hills of scotla nd a spell of snow across the hills of scotland and northern england, maybe even some of hills further south for a time. it will turn back into rain later on as mild air pushes its way in. reaching the north—east of scotla nd in. reaching the north—east of scotland last of all. but after a bright saturday, sunday looking much wetter. today you have severe gales to co nte nt wetter. today you have severe gales to content with across parts of eastern england, and the snow is starting to ease. to you both. you are telling us that after this grim weather we are seeing in scotland, weather we are seeing in scotland, we have sunday to look forward to, when no one has a good day. we have sunday to look forward to, when no one has a good daym we have sunday to look forward to, when no one has a good day. it might not be as bad as that, there will be a few dry moments, but not looking great, no. and more wet and windy weather to come on monday. make it worse, why don't you? so the question regarding carillion is what
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to do, or how to avoid something in the future. and also helpful for those smaller firms caught up in this. the impact of the collapse of carillion is onlyjust becoming clear, for the tens of thousands of employs, and thousands more businesses contracting out to them. the government has said it will continue to fund its public sector contractors. but some workers in the private sector have been laid off, and their future is looking uncertain. this morning, the tuc is calling for a national task force to deal with the fallout. so let's speak to them. paul nowak is the assistant general secretary of tuc. good morning to you. i wonder what you are calling for, and how it would work. we are calling for a task force, a small focus group of unions, and smaller employers, in
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supply chains in particular, to really sit down and think about how we provide support to the thousands of workers who are working for companies which were delivering contracts for carillion, making muqqy contracts for carillion, making muggy by carillion, and are now facing a really uncertain future. i think the focus of that task force has to be how do we protectjobs and livelihoods, how do we move forward and make sure we are able to continue to deliver services and the project carillion was contracted to do. something similar was set up in 2005 after the collapse of a carmaker, which was able to pay out some subsidies to help small firms. if there is a subcontractor watching this, what difference would this task force make to me? well, we know for example that there will be lots of businesses facing short—term pressures because they are owed muqqy pressures because they are owed muggy by carillion. we want to be in a situation where those businesses are able to hold onto staff and not consider redundancies. i would hope
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that a task force could come up with a scheme of short—term financial support. beyond that, we need to provide support to those firms directly affected. i have to say, u nfortu nately, directly affected. i have to say, unfortunately, there will be some people as a result of this dreadful colla pse people as a result of this dreadful collapse of carillion who will lose theirjobs. we have to make sure they have the best possible support. in the longer term, there needs to bea in the longer term, there needs to be a real inquest into how we got into this problem in the first place, to make sure there are not more companies like carillion down the line. and another thing we are calling for is a fundamental risk assessment of the outsourcing companies running our public services. we have seen in the news and the papers about other companies potentially facing problems. let's make sure there are no other companies like carillion down the line. who would pay for this task force ? line. who would pay for this task force? well, the government should pick up the task force. and we have been very clear that the government
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should not be bailing out carillion or the board of directors, but they should be dividing money to help business is directly affected by the collapse. there were 20,000 people directly employed by carillion, and once you get beyond that and start looking at companies which had contracts with carillion, owed money by carillion, you're talking about tens of thousands more people. it is important the government tries to give them some certainty. those workers will have bills at the end of the month, they will have mortgages. i'm sorry to interrupt, because time is tight. private sector firms got involved in carillion knowing the risk, the risk of business that your supplier may not pay. why should the government pay more money for a task force? the government can't wash its hands of this. £1.7 billion of carillion contracts came from the public sector and we know there has already been talk about whether government should have been awarding contracts at the time when it knew the company
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was issuing product warnings. the priority for me today is making sure those tens of thousands of workers have some kind of certainty moving forward , have some kind of certainty moving forward, and the government will have to pick up the bill and step up to the plate, and we are saying join with us, bring in that national task force and let's make a difference. it is good to talk to you. i will see you time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. residents living in a south london tower block that has the same cladding as that used on the grenfell tower have been told they may have to pay millions of pounds to replace its outer skin. leaseholders living in the citiscape building in croydon have been told it could cost them as much as £2 million to replace the aluminium panels on the outside of their building. the tower was one of 228 building across the country which failed fire safety tests carried out in the weeks following the blaze at grenfell, which left 71 people dead. a man has been charged with murdering a a1—year—old woman after a traffic collision in hemel hempstead, in hertfordshire.
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natalie hastings died in hospital on tuesday. her family say she was a beautiful soul, with a big heart. a8—year—old simon whittle has been accused of murder, assaulting a police officer, and damaging police property. he has been remanded in custody. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube: minor delays on northern line, and london overground part suspended between wandsworth road and clapham junction. the wind is causing big problems on the trains this morning. greater anglia has delays on trains between liverpool street and norwich. southern trains are suspended between uckfield and oxted. south—eastern trains are disrupted via hayes. south—western railway services have been suspended between guildford and havant, following two trees on the line. there is also disruption on services between alton and aldershot. c2c trains via ockenden are also affected. and trains in and out king's cross running with delays of up to 50 minutes, due to speed restrictions. on the roads: there are northbound delays on the blackwall tunnel southern approach from blackheath, as traffic avoids the dartford river crossing, due to the closure of the qe2 bridge due to this
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morning's high winds. let's have a check on the weather now, with georgina burnett. good morning. well, after a rather turbulent night last night, things should be easing a little today. but we're not out of the woods just yet, and the met office still has a yellow warning in place for wind, that's until 9:00am this morning. that's because we are still expecting gusts of 60—70 mph over the rush hour. sunny spells and blustery showers on the way. things calming down a little, but still quite a windy day ahead of us. now, those showers are fairly scattered, few and far between. but as the day heads on, they could turn little bit wintry, temperatures getting up to about nine degrees celsius. and most of the showers do tend to clear as we head through this evening, but it may be that ice and frost become an issue, as it turns much colder. temperatures down to freezing tonight. so a frosty start to tomorrow, again some decent sunshine around. there may be one or two showers, but for many a largely dry day.
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still pretty blustery, though, as well. temperatures getting up to about five or six degrees celsius, but a lot calmer on saturday. it's going to be drier, brighter, feeling fairly chilly, and quite frosty to start off the day. again, the same for sunday, except a much more cloudy day, with some rain coming in from the west, and that's going to be fairly heavy at times, as well. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. boosting in border controls and taking more migrants from calais. she will say almost £a5 million will
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be spent beefing up security around the channel. good morning. also this morning: a third day of snow, and a night of strong winds continue to cause hazardous conditions. we have seen seven inches of snow fall in some parts of northern england, severe gales have brought down trees further south. conditions are improving but i have your details in the latest forecast in ten minutes. the government's flagship scheme giving 30 hours of "free" childcare in england isn't working — one charity says parents are having to subsidise it from their own pockets. taxpayers owe private companies — like carillion — almost £200 billion to complete big building projects — and the public spending watchdog says it's not the best value for money. in sport, curtains for konta. the british number one is out of the australian open after a shock
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defeat to the world number 123. singing and helping people with dementia through the power of song — and why there are calls for more people to be have access to it. good morning. first, our main story. britain is to increase its contribution towards border controls in france by nearly £a5 million, and commit to taking in more migrants from calais. the deal will be announced at a summit between theresa may and the french president emmanuel macron this afternoon. academy in sandhurst, is being seen as the most important for several years, as our diplomatic correspondent, james robbins, reports. this summit is very deliberately being held at sandhurst, britain's military academy for officer cadets. the venue underlines the fact that britain and france are the key military powers in europe, used to working together and today, committing to greater cooperation. even if the background to all of this, of course, is brexit.
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and in other ways, britain and france are heading in very different directions. under pressure from president macron, theresa may will take on some migrants stuck in calais and desperate to cross the channel. so, expect more unaccompanied children to be allowed into britain as well as adults who successfully argued that their admission will reunify families. but the longer—term deals will focus on defence. britain is sending three british chinook helicopters to mali, they're large—troop they're large troop carrying aircraft which the french badly lacked in their fight against islamists. so, britain will broaden its military involvement in africa without committing troops. in return, france will back—up british forces in the baltic states of estonia. there, confronting the potential russian threat. james robbins, bbc news. let's speak now to our reporter ian palmer. he's at sandhurst, where the meeting will take place this afternoon. good morning. lots to discuss? lots
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to discuss. you may see the sergeant major marking out the parade square behind me in the band of the coldstrea m behind me in the band of the coldstream guards will be here shortly to welcome emmanuel macron ahead of the talks with theresa may. they will talk about a future relationship between the two countries after brexit. there are no formal brexit talks of course, this is the backdrop. the extra money the uk will spend will be spent on cctv, defence security adds detection systems. the £aa.5 million will be on top of the £100 million the government says it is already spending on security in northern france. the talks that will be here leisa will show the deft negotiation
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skills of a manual macron —— will show. he said he will learn the bayou tapestry to great britain. emmanuel macron needs the cooperation of theresa may, but more importantly, theresa may needs the corporation of a major eu player ahead of the second phase brexit talks. thanks. we will look ahead to that meeting this afternoon. commuters in scotland and northern england are being warned about treacherous driving conditions this morning. an amber weather warning following heavy snow has been lifted. gales and heavy rain have been affecting other areas. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon is in lanarkshire with the latest for us this morning. we get a sense of the conditions, looking behind you. a lot of snow in this part of scotland, about a foot lying by the side of the road. but the m7a, the main link down the west coast between scotland and england is running smoothly. the amber
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weather warning has now been lifted. i think drivers really were heeding that warning from the police which was, in addition to that, which, in effect said, do not travel overnight in the areas where the worst of the weather is expected, unless you really have to. there is still a high risk of disruption. people are being advised to drive cautiously, especially in south—west scotland where conditions can be poor in places on the more minor roads. no repeat of that situation overnight on tuesday where hundreds of drivers we re on tuesday where hundreds of drivers were stranded. problems elsewhere with the weather, high winds across the uk. those winds reaching 78 mph amavi gusts in wales. —— and the gusts in wales. the public spending watchdog says taxpayers could face a bill of almost £200 billion for deals signed under private finance initiatives. pfis cover companies like carillion and the national audit office says there are more than 700 deals still in place.
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ben is here to explain more. good morning. morning. there are lots of issues about why the government is outsourcing this work. a p pa re ntly government is outsourcing this work. apparently paying more for this work thanif apparently paying more for this work than if it was doing it itself. this isa than if it was doing it itself. this is a report from the national audit office, looking at how many of these deals are underway. this is coming to light after the korean collapse. they are nothing new, private finance initiatives —— after the carillion collapse. what they have done is they have done the sums and they have worked out they will pay £200 billion for these deals over the next 30 years. even if we sign no more new deals from tomorrow. very costly. they have worked out that it could be cheaper if the command was to build those projects itself. supporters of pf! say it is
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great because you transfer all of that risk and the cost of the maintenance and construction to a private firm and that private firm ta kes private firm and that private firm takes on that risk, not the government. but critics, this report points out that that is much more costly in many cases. it also means that some organisations, particularly the nhs are caught up in very costly contracts that are very difficult to get out. as we have seen in the case of carillion, if those firms don't deliver, maybe it is the taxpayer that will pay. the somebody you want is the cost of the risk for private companies to see if it actually has outweighed the cost of the government doing a —— the sum you want. the cost of the government doing a -- the sum you want. these are very difficult to cost, it is difficult to work out how much it will cost to build the road or the school, so many variables. are the costs escalate. and private companies say you, to do this, need more money. that defeats the object if you ask for more money. that eliminates...
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then they take the risk. there are calls for all women over the age of 30 to be screened for a faulty gene linked to higher rates of breast and ovarian cancer. research by the barts cancer institute in london found testing would prevent thousands of cancers, and be cost—effective for the nhs. patient safety in accident and emergency units in wales is being compromised to an "unacceptable degree" according to hospital consultants. a group of a6 doctors is warning of the risks in a letter sent to the first minister. monthly performance figures will be published later this morning. nhs wales say it's been a very challenging winter, but things are starting to improve. president trump has unveiled the list of ‘winners‘ in his "fake news awards." he took to twitter to announce thejournalists and media outlets he's branded as inaccurate. among the "winners" were cnn and the new york times. mr trump later tweeted to say there are a lot of reporters he does respect. did we get put on that list, the
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respect list? i don't know, iwould have to check. it is eight minutes past ten. parents in england are subsidising free nursery care because it hasn't been properly funded by the government — that's according to a survey published today. the report found that mercenaries are having to ask parents to cover the cost of nappies and lunches if they provide 30 hours of free childcare. the government says it was never due to cover the cost of meals and services. it is not free to providers, we are subsidising this policy. it is not free to parents or children because we're having to ask for additional contributions to cover part of what we offer that the funding does not cover. we would love for the word free to be replaced with the word funding or subsidised. the actor peter wyngarde, who played the flamboyant 60s crime—fighterjason king, has died aged 90.
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wyngarde shot to fame in the series department s, but was also a prolific stage actor and director. his agent described wyngarde as the most extraordinary man he had ever met. half of people living in private rented properties in the uk have not had a carbon monoxide alarm installed by their landlord according to a campaign group called project shout. around 50 people are killed each year from carbon monoxide poisoning. symptoms of poisoning can include headaches, dizziness, breathlessness or tiredness. legally, landlords only need to fit alarms that can detect the gas in buildings where there are "solid fuel burning appliances. " that means where material like wood or coal are used instead of gas — on friday mps will debate if the law needs to be extended.
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joining us now is mark hazleton from the london fire brigade, and chloe kilby, whose uncle died as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning. good morning. first of all, tell us what happened. he passed away two yea rs what happened. he passed away two years ago yesterday. after being hospitalised for just coming hospitalised forjust coming up to nine years. he was an accredited state, he could breathe for himself but he couldn't communicate, he couldn't eat, he couldn't walk. he was a shell of himself, really. what happened originally, what was the incident? here's flu in his boiler was faulty, the pipe that connects. for some reason, that night, there was a big surge of carbon monoxide which went into the flat instead of the pipes and he was taking pain at the pipes and he was taking pain at the time and he never woke up. —— he was taking a nap at the time. the reason you are talking about this, as we explained, there is a discussion to be held about whether to extend the law. you will explain
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this. at the moment, it is solid burning fuels, wood and coal. if they are burned in a property for heat or to power boilers, then there should be a carbon monoxide detector. but if it is only gas appliances, doesn't need to be one installed by landlords? that is right. under the smoke regulations 2015, where there is a solid fuel burning appliance, you should fit a carbon monoxide detector. we think that should be extended to cover all sorts of fuel burning appliances. carbon monoxide can be produced if you are burning wood and it can also be produced if you are burning gas or be produced if you are burning gas ora be produced if you are burning gas or a liquid. why is there a difference in the first place? was gas seen as less likely to emit co2? possibly. there were other regulation that covered the gas industry and installations but it is not as comprehensive as we would like. we would like to make sure that all rental properties have a carbon monoxide detector anywhere that any fuel is burned. carbon monoxide detector anywhere that any fuel is burnedlj carbon monoxide detector anywhere that any fuel is burned. i know you have brought one of the devices in,
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shall i hold it up to the camera? very small devices, costs, people worry about cost in relation to things, including safety. how much does it cost? they are around £15, slightly dearer than a smoke detector but still quite cheap. most of them come with a sealed for life battery, you tested every now and then according to the instructions but you can leave it alone to do its job. chloe, how would that have change the narrative about what happened to your uncle? it would have saved his life potentially. if you place at one metre away from the boiler and if there is any sort of chance that there is carbon monoxide lea k chance that there is carbon monoxide leak in comet will start beeping. and then you can get onto the gas man and he can sort out the boiler —— leaking, it will start beeping. they didn't have one installed, you would not have seen it heard it was melted. it is a silent killer. you have learned a lot about your uncle's death. you don't smell carbon monoxide. -- he would not
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have smelted. the symptoms are dizziness like common cold, you can get headaches and tiredness, but because he was working, he didn't feel it. and when he came back to his flat, he felt bad. but we didn't know that. mark, this is about legislation, whether the landlord should be forced to do this. in your experience are some landlords doing it anyway? you go into properties and see after fires, what are you seeing in practical terms. and see after fires, what are you seeing in practicalterms. a similar story to smoke alarms, good landlords will provide safety equipment and look after people but many are not as proactive. we would like to say to people, be practical, these things are relatively cheap, by one, put it in any room with a fuel burning appliance. and when you go on holiday you are staying and an apartment that might have a gas boiler gas heating, take the
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detector with you so you'll have a warning. you say the responsibility lies with the landlord but people could do that anyway. exactly, talk to your landlord, remind them of their responsibilities, it is their job. we want the public to know the risks and know how dangerous it is come you cannot smell it, see it tasted. do something about it and get your own alarm. with no disrespect to anyone who has suffered from this or has lost a family member this way, we don't carry smoke alarms when we go on holiday to apartments, we are not going to start checking out apartments to see of carbon monoxide detectors a re apartments to see of carbon monoxide detectors are there, people just won't do that. i get that, it's similar with smoke alarms, we say that you should fit a fire alarm anywhere where there is fire. people say they are not going to carry an
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alarm that if they realise how dangerous carbon monoxide is, and it is the fact that there is nothing you are doing directly to cause that, so when you do something dangerous or reckless you know there isa dangerous or reckless you know there is a risk attached. you are not aware of it. it is often the way, when yourfamily aware of it. it is often the way, when your family have been affected by this you become pretty evangelical. you must get frustrated when people say, well, i will get around to it! everyone and has bought one and if they have not, we are like, please buy one because it could save your life. what more can you say about it? you cannot detect it unless you have an alarm and get your appliances regularly checked. chloe, thank you very much, mark, thank you. it's 8.17. matt, what is happening with the weather, we have weather warnings and snow over southern scotland.
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some trees have come down in southern parts of england and wales overnight. in other areas, snow as far as the eye can see, this was the scene assured while ago in county durham. in northern england we saw up durham. in northern england we saw up to seven inches of snow fall overnight, that continues to have an impact on some roads, we can show you the chart earlier, into cumbria, northumberland, into county durham, all these routes across the north are still having an impact and ice could become a major issue. away from that winds easing that, they have picked, we have seen the winds of 60 miles an hour on the kent coast but the worst of the winds are clearing off towards the north sea. still blustery here. not a bad start if you factor out the winds, a lot of dry weather, trees down affecting
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travel, check with bbc local radio before you go out, further west, sunshine in between, some heavy downpours around liverpool bay towards cheshire, they will work back into north—west england, snow of higher ground, ice risk in northern england. the sleet and snow flurries there, throughout the day, they could merge into longer spells of snow giving further examinations, wintry showers into northern england, showers you can see are of rain, sleet and hale, thunder can't be ruled out. it will be a day when the wind has an impact on the way things feel, they will feel subzero by the strength of the breeze even though it is easing compared with earlier on across parts of scotland and northern ireland. they will stay blustery overnight, further snow covering parts of western scotland and northern ireland, and other northern england in particular, a risk of ice or mask on friday morning, just about anywhere could
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be frosty, where you have showers overnight, icy conditions on some of the roads and pavements. tomorrow, more snow than we've had this morning, showers elsewhere across england and wales, the further south you are, the more likely to be rain and hail, sunshine, some areas of avoiding shelves altogether, another rather cool day, temperatures feeling much colder when the breeze kicks in. into the weekend they could be early cloud and patchy rain across the south which quickly eases on saturday morning. both were widespread frost, dry and brighter for the majority. but the cloud becomes thicker towards the south—west, outbreaks of rain become extensive through the night and into sunday. that's pushing into cold air, sunday morning could start with snow over northern england and southern scotland, milder air will push in turning it back to rain eventually. still a little snow potentially on sunday but the week
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ahead looks milder than the week just gone. matt, stay where you are for the moment, all will be revealed ina for the moment, all will be revealed in a second. we're talking about children getting taller this morning after the country's leading school uniform manufacturer said demand for longer length trousers, blazers and skirts is soaring. cani can i speak on behalf of the smaller people in the world? it is not a bad thing not being talk you can be small and perfectly formed. let's see a picture of matt when he was little. laughter iam laughter i am smaller, the taller one is my brotherjames, he will kill me! i hope he is at work at the moment! we talk about youngsters who appear to be getting taller... oh, no! that hair rivals charlie's, matrix. i think they are lovely pictures. ——
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matt. i think diminutive is a fair word to apply to you.” matt. i think diminutive is a fair word to apply to you. i think it's fair, i could probably still fit into my primary school uniform! there is an image. we talked earlier with ben who was six feet five as a teenager and he is now six and a half feet. i'm just a little short of that! we are big on the inside! in a moment we'll speak to a paediatrician about whether children are getting taller, and what's causing it. lets doctors and parents in manchester first. how can i help you? we need trousers forjake. most of our 11—year—olds are probably the size of a 12 or 13—year—old. we don't do very many small
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sizes now — probably two, three in a year. most small sizes are what we call regular sizes now. had a growth spurt, they both have. they were there, now they are here. a couple of years ago, at this size, he would have probably been exceptionally tall in his class. now, he's much more in line with other boys his age. has he stopped growing yet? no, definitely not! or i'm shrinking. he has grown steadily, a centimetre a month, for the last 18 months or so. so yes, i would like him to stop now, please. dr ravi jayaram is a paediatric consultant. hejoins us now. good morning. we are hearing that children are getting taller. is this a good thing? what does it show about society and nutrition? what it tells us is generally in spite of the worries about children's diets they are getting more minerals,
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vitamins and protein than they were 150 yea rs vitamins and protein than they were 150 years ago, coming closer to fulfilling their genetic potential. afford one of the main problems was that children were becoming fatter, —— i thought that was one of the main problems. it has almost gone too far the other way. in the 19th century before the industrial revolution people were significantly smaller. in old houses doorways were smaller. in old houses doorways were smaller because they didn't need to be very high for people to walk through, when you visit old places you have to bend. health is getting better because people have fewer diseases so that energy can be used for growing and nutrition is better. it's interesting to joke about obesity because if you are overweight and hit puberty earlier you have your growth spurt earlier so people will start getting shorter. although it is clear that if you look and socio— economic good times children grow better and in bad times they don't grow as much.
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what about when people grow, as in the age? some people say, i was quite small and then suddenly grew when i was 15, or they grow at different times in their lives. what do we know about that. you have your growth spurt at puberty can happen between eight and nine, or between 15 and 16. when i was 13 here's a picture of me with school friends, i used to do rowing and i was a head above the others. and then three yea rs later above the others. and then three years later my head goes up to their shoulders. i grew early and i thought, brilliant, taller than eve ryo ne thought, brilliant, taller than everyone else, and that my kind of stayed the same. can you take advantage of your growth spurt and increase and more by eating better? i'm trying to establish the link between eating well and growing taller. and it's not being genetic, if you see what i mean! genetics is a big part of it. we will never be
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taller than our genes allow. in the past, people have not fulfilled that genetic potential. so it is not a case of if you eat more and more you will be taller and taller but if you eat enough and all the other things in the environment are right he will hit your genetic potential. my mother is only four foot 11, bless her. i suspect that genetically speaking she could have been taller. but she grew up in india, she had a lot going on in her childhood and did not hit her genetic potential. i am four foot ten and did not hit her genetic potential. i am fourfoot ten and a did not hit her genetic potential. i am four foot ten and a half. people ta ke am four foot ten and a half. people take pride in the height of their children as if it is something they have achieved. it is funny.” children as if it is something they have achieved. it is funny. i five foot ten and a half. people look after their children well in terms of nourishing them but apart from genetics there's not much else. know what is encouraging? my mum is five
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feet tall and i thought i would be really short. obviously she had issues and she fed me very well! lovely, thank you very much. time to get the news and weather where you are. see you soon. coming up next, the latest business news in business live. snow across southern scotland last night but in south—east england gusts of up to 80 miles an hour in parts of norfolk and suffolk. gradually to the next few hours those winds will ease away. as we go
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through the day for many of us it is a case of sunshine and showers. we've got showers coming towards northern and western areas, snow over the higher ground, further south and east, some drier weather, sunny spells into the afternoon and much lighter winds compared to this morning. maximum temperatures two or three celsius in the north—west but it'll feel like —2 this. overnight tonight, more wintry showers in the west again, ice will be a big risk and of course bow to the max no lying around. still pretty chilly, the potential for ice lying around. still pretty chilly, the potentialfor ice perhaps, temperatures will be below freezing further north. friday, more showers into northern and western areas, further examinations of snow in northern and western ireland,
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further south, those shows will be many of rain and there will be brighter weather throughout the day with sunshine coming through, again it will be cold. for many of us it will be dry on saturday. some rain moving into the south—west of england, temperatures rising slightly, by sunday rain in all areas, falling as snow on the higher ground of the pennines, and the grampians, windy conditions in the south and west, temperatures reaching double figures across the south and west. that is it from me. bye bye. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock
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and susannah streeter. full steam ahead for china, as the world's second biggest economy beats growth expectations. live from london, that's our top story on thursday 18th january. china's 6.9% growth for last year is the first time the annual figure has risen in nearly a decade. we'll tell you why and what it means for the rest of the world. also in the programme: bitcoin in the firing line. yet again.

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